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Online RedBikeAgain3

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Re: How suspension and geometry works
« Reply #80 on: February 15, 2019, 09:53:22 PM »
*Originally Posted by stikflote [+]
How do I ride if I didn't know which was clutch or brake ,I just dont understand why one fork is preload and different ,seems to me you have forks acting differently, ,by the way this is the first bike I had with forks that can be altered

but I bet, I have a bike licence longer that you ,my first bike was a 350cc BSA 1946 I passed m,y test on a 500 Norton ,Have an awful lot of bikes
.at present moment I have three bikes two Kawasaki,s and triumph
Hmm Ive wondered about them acting differently but in thinking about the front suspension a prof bike engineer would probably call it a front fork (singular) made up of the yokes fork legs and spindle. I think the forces are shared out through the whole system. The forces when lent over cornering and hitting bumps will not be even between the legs but system shares the forces out.
Sort of like having a single front brake disc doesnt mean the bike veers to one side (I think that analogy works ish)


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Yam DT80, Honda CB250RS, Yam XJ650, Suzuki X7, Kawa GPz500, Honda CB-1 (400), Yam FZS600 and now ... ST

Offline JonyB

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Re: How suspension and geometry works
« Reply #81 on: February 15, 2019, 10:41:58 PM »
*Originally Posted by JanM [+]
Having the two forklegs do different things makes for cheaper builds due to less parts and as long as it can be looked at as a system due to the stiff front axle, it is OK. Several WSB and other highend forks are also built this way, but using much higher quality parts, eg. Ohlins, K-Tech, Bitubo and probably others. And it is common to have aftermarket high quality cartridgekits with different function in each leg.

Cheaper build? I'm no expert, but this type of forks are considered to be a step above your traditional USD forks. If not, why else would Triumph gone down that route on the newer 765? Maybe I'm wrong.

Anyway, for me it's also a bit weird how these work exactly, but I'd say the black magic voodoo priests that developed and engineered the forks, know what they're conjuring... My understanding is that one leg looks after preload, and the other is in charge of damping, just as tim.8061 said.

Best is to search and read your manual which will give you enough for you to do your personal adjustment... For us mere mortals the only thing that changes is where the adjusters are located, but what to do to set it up, is governed by the same fundamental principles.

Hope it helps.
Ride to add life to your days, not days to your life.

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Offline JonyB

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Re: How suspension and geometry works
« Reply #82 on: February 15, 2019, 10:44:16 PM »
*Originally Posted by RedBikeAgain3 [+]
Hmm Ive wondered about them acting differently but in thinking about the front suspension a prof bike engineer would probably call it a front fork (singular) made up of the yokes fork legs and spindle. I think the forces are shared out through the whole system. The forces when lent over cornering and hitting bumps will not be even between the legs but system shares the forces out.
Sort of like having a single front brake disc doesnt mean the bike veers to one side (I think that analogy works ish)


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Agree...
Ride to add life to your days, not days to your life.

Street Triple R 2011
ZX9R C2 (1999)
HEL || JayBee Biker Bits || STOMPGRIP || MOTUL

Offline stikflote

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Re: How suspension and geometry works
« Reply #83 on: February 15, 2019, 10:57:42 PM »
Thanks for the replies,  it did take a bit of getting used to gear pedal on left
and brake on right on my first Honda

 


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